Inactive Middle-Aged Men More Likely To Develop Gum Disease

January 2, 2017 by Dr David Bloom

Gum Disease

Join 3000 patients who like us on Facebook


Exercise to Keep Your Gums Healthy

We are all aware that exercise is important to our health and that being inactive can lead to a number of serious health conditions.

However, not many of us realise that not exercising enough could be a factor that influences the risk of developing gum disease.

According to a recent study carried out by researchers at the Hannover Medical School, middle-aged men who lead inactive lives are more prone to gum disease than their peers who exercise regularly, the British Dental Health Foundation reported on its website.

For the study, researchers examined 72 healthy men aged between 45 and 65, most of whom worked in offices and engaged in very little or no physical activity. They were given a thorough gum testing which revealed moderate to serious gum disease in those who were older and less active.

One of the possible reasons for the higher risk of the disease is snacking while at work, researchers note.

The British Dental Health Foundation explained that the majority of adults have some form of gum disease, but it usually develops very slowly and can be kept under control so that no teeth are lost over a lifetime.

Being physically inactive emerges as a contributing factor to the faster development of the disease.

According to Nigel Carter, chief executive of the British Dental Health Foundation, results from the research highlight the importance of oral care, especially for the older demographic group targeted in the study.

Similar Post

GUM HEALTH: HOW TO KEEP YOUR GUMS AND TEETH HEALTHY

Gum Disease is caused by a build-up of the bacteria which live in the plaque and tartar on your teeth. The harmful chemicals produced by the bacteria irritate your gums causing them to bleed.

If you don’t remove plaque every day, you may find that your gums become swollen and red and that they bleed easily when you brush your teeth.

Medically reviewed & updated on April 19, 2019

Medically Reviewed By:

Dr David Bloom

Reviewed by Dr David Bloom

Comments:

No comments yet.

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.

Trustpilot