Parents Should Start Taking Care Of Their Child’s Teeth Early

January 14, 2017 by Dr David Bloom

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Take Proper Care of Infant’s Teeth

Parents are advised to start taking care of their baby’s teeth as soon as the first one appears, usually between five and seven months.

Although children should be encouraged to take care of their teeth on their own, to get them into a good routine early on, it is best that parents assist their children with brushing until they are at least seven years old.

Recent research from Aquafresh revealed that parents spend an average of three days every year trying to get their children to brush their teeth. The survey highlighted an alarming misunderstanding among 27% of parents, who do not think they need to brush their children’s teeth until they have between two and five.

However, baby teeth enamel is about 50% thinner than that of adult teeth and by the time children reach two or three years old, a decay process may have already started as well as increased risk of gum disease.

The key job for parents is to teach their children that brushing is important:

  • Encouraging the habit at an early age will help children take better care of their own teeth throughout their life.
  • Making brushing fun by playing a song, counting teeth or using an exciting toothbrush are all good ways to make the task more enjoyable.
  • It is also important to explain to children why brushing is important in a way that they can understand.

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SHOULD TOOTH DECAY IN YOUNG CHILDREN BE TREATED WITH A FILLING?

According to new research by the University of Manchester, one in ten British children at the age of five have a filling and about two in five have tooth decay.

However, many dental experts claim there is no need to fill milk teeth unless they cause pain or discomfort, as they will fall out anyway.

HOW TO PROTECT YOUR CHILD’S TEETH

Despite the fact that children today have healthier teeth than ever before, tooth decay rates could still be improved with joint efforts from the government, communities, and parents. This is evident from a nursery programme in Scotland called Childsmile, where nursery staff offered free tooth-brushing for children every day.

The initiative dramatically reduced costs in dental care for five-year-old children living in Scotland. Taking proper care of a child’s teeth is not difficult if the foundations are laid early.

Medically Reviewed By:

Dr David Bloom

Reviewed by Dr David Bloom

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